No on B: the Teleplay!

With Americans preparing to go to the polls in just a few days, there’s plenty of discussion about who to vote for, who not to vote for, and whether or not presidential candidate Roseanne Barr is even on the ballot. Angelenos, however, will have to decide on one county measure that could see thousands out of work, hundreds of companies moving out of state, and the government having far too much control over, of all things, the adult entertainment industry.

Measure B is the controversial ordinance that would, in essence, make shooting porn without condoms and other protective devices illegal, and would see offenders fined and possibly jailed. Proponents of the measure cite allegedly rampant STD and HIV infection rates among adult performers and claim the ordinance is about protecting those having sex on camera. Opponents argue that Measure B is an infringement of their constitutional right to have sex however they see fit, on camera or off; that the adult industry is aggressively self-regulated and performers are much less likely to contract an STD than someone fucking in the general populace; that, if enacted, the ordinance would see the adult industry moving out of state, causing a huge increase in unemployment rates due to lack of work for those that work in off-screen positions throughout the industry; and, according to MarketWatch, it would cost LA county “in excess of $300,000″ to start the program and $1.7 million or more per year to maintain, according to a report from Los Angeles Fire Department.

You, however, might not be in LA and might not see what all the fuss is about. How convenient then that James Deen and Jessica Drake, both staunch opponents of the measure, have, under Kimberly Kane’s direction, produced the following informational video, showing what porn could very well be like should Measure B pass.

No on Measure B

Moving Towards a Trans-Friendly America

It has been a big week for transgender Americans, with a landmark U.S. Tax Court ruling and the passing of a bill in Massachusetts that will grant legal civil rights protection to transgender individuals. The Transgender Equal Rights bill, approved by the State Senate Wednesday, will, when signed by supportive Governor Deval Patrick, grants transgender MA residents protection against employment, education, housing, and credit discrimination, as well as include gender identity and gender expression to the state’s hate crimes law. Legislative Counsel for the American Civil Liberties Union of Massachusetts, Gavi Wolfe, stated: “This bill is about giving transgender people an equal shot at obtaining everyday basics we all need — a job, a place to live, an education. It’s a major step forward for fairness, and we urge the legislature to pass it right away.” The fight for transgender equality is not over, however, as a key clause calling for protection against discrimination in public accommodations was dropped two days before the vote after heavy criticisms from House Republicans.

In the U.S. Tax Court, a ruling may now force the Internal Revenue Service to allow transgender individuals to deduct unreimbursed medical expenses from federal tax returns, as any other citizen would a non-gender related medical expense. Rhiannon O’Donnabhain changed her sex from male to female and attempted to deduct hormone therapy and surgery from her 2010 tax return only to find the IRS disallowing on the basis that these procedures “did not treat a medically recognized disease or promote the proper function of the body.”

The Tax Court, however, saw things differently citing four bases for its ruling in favor of Ms. O’Donnabhain: “1) the disorder is widely recognized in diagnostic and psychiatric reference texts; 2) the texts and all three experts testifying in the case consider the disorder a serious medical condition; 3) the mental health professionals who examined Ms. O’Donnabhain found that her disorder was a severe impairment; and, 4) the Courts of Appeal generally consider gender identity disorder a serious medical condition.” Although she was not able to claim a deduction for her breast enhancement surgery – the court said her tits were fine without it – and although the ruling notes that it is “not to be relied upon or otherwise cited as precedent by taxpayers,” the IRS has agreed to no longer hold the official position of denying gender reassignment patients and those having treatment for Gender Identity Disorder the same tax rights as cisgender citizens.

Putting the XXX Back in Online Porn

.XXXAlthough it seems to have been a very long time coming, the exclusively adult top-level domain has finally hit the World Wide Web. Officially launching its Sunrise period (accepting applications from trademark owners only) on September 7th, ICM Registry, the company charged with administering the launch of the controversial new url suffix, appear to be on the verge of raking in the cash thanks to yearly fees of $100 to $300 a year. And it’s not just porn companies that will be enjoying the .xxx domains – come December anyone who is willing to pony up the dough can register their very own XXX website, even for something as inoffensive as a Shia LaBeouf fansite.

We’ll have to wait a few months before we see whether or not prominent pornsites migrate to a new XXX domain or remain where they are, sitting quite comfortably on dot coms, dot nets, and (if you can believe it) dot bizs. Is this new XXX domain signaling a sea change that will further separate the adult entertainment industry from its mainstream brother or is it the start of an apparently ever-increasing amalgamation of the two worlds? Only time, and ICM Registry’s annual reports, will tell.

Animated and Underrated

With 1080p High Definition porn throwing everyone and his brother all into a tizzy, you might think all other forms of pornographic expression had suddenly become obsolete. In dozens of online communities, however, an ancient digital image format is curiously finding new use as a sexually provocative blogging aid. Graphics Interchange Format, more commonly known as GIF, used to be regarded as a format only used by game developers, bulletin board nerdlingers, and people who think brief 256-color animations of pinwheels are a remarkable display of advance technology. Nowadays the GIF is being plastered all over the ‘net and usually in NSFW environments, to boot!

It started on message boards then worked its way into the mainstream via Tumblr, but the resurgence in GIF appreciation still seems lost on many people, whether they’ve embraced Tumblr or not. Sure, the detail in an animated GIF isn’t very good and the colors look kinda blotchy and god knows there’s no audio, but there sure is something pretty exciting about watching, say, London Keyes get take the exact same eleven inches of man-meat over and over and over again, forever repeating until you move onto something else or blow an almighty load.

Clearly the best thing about GIFs, though, is that they’re so small, so short, and so deliciously hypnotic that they can be enjoyed by fans everywhere without the studios worrying that their products are simply being stolen from them and reproduced poorly and in full elsewhere. Think of GIF Porn as the ultimate content sampling tool. There’s a whole world of pornographic delights out there and the Tumblrs, blogs, and message boards that pass these illicit visual treats around could be the industry’s most underutilized marketing tool. Who do you think is going to make hotter gifs, the A/V whizzes at Zero Tolerance and Reality Kings or some 19-year-old dude with too much time (and moisturizer) on his hands? Exactly my point.